It’s been a while…

I highly encourage blogging, yet here is sit not blogging in quite some time. No real reason why, but not real topic to talk about either. 

So today, I am looking for inner balance and change.  I recently read that 12 minutes of prayer a day can change the makeup of your brain.  You can read about it here

I don’t necessarily agree with Olsteen often, but I do know I can feel a physical change when I pray or when I know someone is praying specifically for me. Do you?  

Have any of you read the Proverbs 31 books or Power of a praying woman?  Thoughts on those?  


I don’t have a lot to add here, but I would love to hear your stories of how praying for yourself specifically has changed you and what all you studied while doing that. 

Last costumes 

I saw a blog with the cutest last minute costumes for moms to be!  Thought I would share here


Also, we had to have story books characters last week for school and I wanted something cheap and easy. My daughter loves the book Library Mouse so that’s the book she chose. It was super easy and last minute. 


One of the boys took a counting Starwars book. 

And then there is a football player. Who read a football chapter books


What are your quick and easy costume ideas for the mom out there that has had a tough couple weeks and didn’t get to buy a costume yet?  

Moms Unite 

Did you know October is Eczema Awareness month ?  It’s hard. It’s the same month as Breast Cancer Awareness. Both are horrible awful issues affecting lots and lots of people. 


Sadly, I think all other awareness issues get overtaken by the pink ribbons and funds raising for a “cure.”

Don’t get me wrong I totally think it’s important and I am not discounting the severity of the that disease in any way, BUT I do know eczema deserves more research and recognition. It deserves more awareness, more support for moms of children who suffer from eczema. It should be information at your finger tips about causes, treatments and the emotional gunk that comes from the balancing act that is eczema. 


This post is a lot of rambling, but I know I am not the only eczema mom that felt alone in our battle. I know I am not the only one that felt like it was lotion after lotion, steroid after steroid, doctor visit after visit and like I am on a hamster wheel never getting off.  


I guess I want to make other moms like me know:

You aren’t alone…I am here

There are treatments that will work…find your windex. 

Ours is CLn bodywash
You need some one to cry, vent or just talk to? Eczema mom understands. 

And you know what it doesn’t make you a bad mom to not know the cure yet, be frustrated, not want to do the WHOLE bedtime skin routine or back the bag of all the extra stuff you need to get through the day.


It’s ok it makes you human and every once and a while gosh darn it we can cry cause we are frustrated. 

Eczema may control your child’s skin and it probably feels like it controls your life…it sure did mine for a while, but just take a moment to share your story with me, facebook, twitter or the world and see how many other people will stand united and say “Eczema stinks!”  We deserve a bigger voice and today it starts here!  

We don’t need some Ribbon or tons of money to help find a cure. All it takes is a small village to change the world. Let’s support moms and their kids! And share what has helped calm the eczema monster in your life. 

Guest Blogger- Ashley Vender 

In honor of Eczema awareness month I asked a fellow eczema mom to share her story here! 

Meet Ashley and family:

Ashley Vender is a former consumer packaged goods marketer turned freelance consultant. She is a mother (and Dr Mom) to two children and lives on the Northshore of Chicago. She advocates for eczema awareness and treatment, serves on her son’s preschool board and believes in healthy, active living. She is also a hockey mom, soccer mom, home cook and an eternal optimist.  


“Why was I born this way?” The first time my daughter, 5, asked that question, she sputtered out the words between sobs. Her tiny shoulders were curled forward in defeat and her face was pure heartbreak. She was looking up at me from the bathtub, where she was soaking in bleach. It stung her skin, raw from yet another eczema flair. I wanted to cry—for her—too.

We’d just returned home from an emergency allergist appointment. The allergist had examined my daughter for signs of staph, and had once again told us to stay the course with the nightly (awful) regimen: a 10 minute soak in a bleach bath, followed by prescription steroids that also stung, followed by head-to-toe ointment. The morning regimen was more stinging steroids and ointment, and an oral allergy medicine to help with itching.

An emergency allergist appointment was nothing new for us, but this was the first appointment where my daughter was old enough to listen and process what was going on. She realized she wasn’t one of the lucky ones that outgrew eczema by age 5. She realized she wasn’t getting better, that the baths and creams she despised were not going away. She realized that she was different.


I’d realized my daughter was different when she was just days old. I remember asking the newborn photographer if she could retouch out the splotches on my daughter’s face. When friends and family came to meet her, I handed my daughter over with apologies for how rashy she looked. I asked about different creams and ointments and cleansers at every pediatrician appointment. We spent our first family vacation nervously keeping my daughter in the shade because the sun, sunscreen, and pool seemed to turn her even blotchier. By the time she was 11 months old, we’d been through a battery of allergy tests and tried our first (unsuccessful) elimination diet. But still, the red patches came.

We got on 3 month long wait lists with “the best” eczema specialists in the US. We spent small fortunes on “calming lotions” and kept leapfrogging to stronger levels of steroid creams. And still, the red patches came. Then the scratching started. So. Much. Scratching. My daughter stopped sleeping through the night during flare ups. She’d scratch until she bled in her sleep, then wake up in pain. We tried bleach baths for the first time, and adopted a bathing routine so complicated that either my husband or I had to be home from work every night in time for bathtime—no leaving something so important up to a nanny.


We planned family activities around our daughter’s skin. We traveled with our own soap, sheets, towels and enough creams and ointments to cover half the state of Illinois. We sent our daughter to preschool with special lotion and a list of restrictions, and still had an eczema flair so bad she missed a week of school and ended up on the Z-pack. We blew through our health insurance deductibles with rounds of testing and prescriptions that didn’t work. We saw multiple dermatologists, switched pediatricians three times and allergists three times, each time frustrated by the lack of options and ever decreasing quality of life for my daughter. Weeks were divided into “good skin days” and “bad skin days.” But all days were frustrating days. Because our daughter–no, our daughter’s skin–was different.

When my daughter asked that night in the bathtub why she “was born this way,” I had no good answer for why she had eczema, or for why it was so bad. My heartbreak matched hers. But what I did have was a promise. A promise to never stop looking for a solution, to never give up on her. I asked my whole universe (real friends, facebook friends, old coworkers, my entire family) to help me look for alternative treatments. To help me find a doctor that understood the link between eczema and quality of life. And…the universe answered.


My father-in-law (a physician himself) happened to play a round of golf with the inventor of CLn BodyWash. My FIL mentioned our daughter, and the inventor sent us a bottle of body wash to try. It was LIFE CHANGING. It gave my daughter all the therapeutic benefits of a bleach bath, but without the stinging or actual bleaching. Bathtime went from 30 minutes of tears, thrashing, spotted clothes and exhaustion to an easy, sweet childhood experience. And we’ve found that since she tolerates baths better, her skin needs fewer steroids. She is itching less (we think because bleach isn’t drying out her skin as much and that she is in water less) and therefore inflaming her eczema less. Our daughter is happy and she feels NORMAL–finally. We still have flare ups, but we deal with them better now. She attends a public school and has no restrictions. She plays ice hockey, goes to camp and is on a soccer team. And her skin does not hurt. I, as a mother, know I cannot make everything perfect for her always. But it feels pretty damn good to make her feel normal. Normal is enough for now.

Part 2 Outside In…

So, we went back to the dermatologist and he said he hadn’t seen eczema that didn’t at least look like it had STARTED to heal, especially with the amount of medication she was on. 

It made me sad to think her legs and feet could possibly look like they did forever. I WAS REALLY WORRIED WE WOULD HAVE TO AMPUTATE HER PINKY TOE.


Thankfully, he did have good news… she qualified for a medical study. We were to use a bodywash 3 times a week. The directions were very specific to get skin wet, lather on and leave for 1-3 minutes and then rinse. 


I wasn’t sure at first what to think, but honestly we had no other options and nothing to lose!  And NOTHING else had worked. Was she going to be stuck with skin like this forever? 


12 weeks later I was more grateful than ever that we found CLn bodywash and that we were able to be in the study. We had no idea that a couple of bottles of bodywash would be so instrumental in our future.  

Isn’t it?

Here is a video describing what she went through and how one simple product significantly changed our lives.

 5 years later her skin is still clear and all the other issues she had have completely cleared up and NOT come back!  And she’s just a happy 7 year old doing her thing!